Mark Tassi

Holistic Health the Way Nature Intended

Tag: success

Nature’s Design

I find it interesting that people, upon having certain problems while on a particular diet, rashly jump and blame those problems on the diet. I am now referring, in particular, to a primarily fruit and vegetable based diet, or a diet of fruits and tender leafy greens with the inclusion of small amounts of raw nuts and seeds. Instead, in full faith of the perfection and completion of nature and the understanding of one’s exact place in that scheme, of closely and carefully analyzing one’s actions in one’s personal practice and trying to ascertain those shortcomings which would cause one to do anything but thrive, those individuals often blame the diet, ridicule the messenger and condemn that which the Creator put into place in the beginning.

I’ve heard people blame all sorts of things on the fruit and vegetable diet from loss of libido to being unable to maintain or attain muscle mass.

What these people do not realize is that the body takes years to correct years of abuse and unnatural living. They have a lack of faith in the design, in the natural plan. They are lost, having been unable to ascertain what the natural plan is in the first place.

Admittedly, it is not always so easy to discern what is natural from what is not in a world where false prophets and self-styled “teachers” abound. What is more, propaganda from the media instigated by the “food” industries lead most astray. The protein anthem is heard at every turn: “Where do you get your protein? Where do you get your protein?” Stuff and nonsense is spread by the three industries as they deal in death.

It took me over 12 years of eating fruit before my body was able to derive the full benefits of its nutrition. If one has trouble when first adopting such a diet, it’s not the diet, it’s you! How can a food, which our species was designed to eat, bring anything but the highest benefits? To think otherwise is not logical.

When I almost died of hyponatremia nearly 3 years ago, it would have been easy to blame it on the diet as most around me already had. However, not only did I make mistakes in the diet’s application which I ascertained from objective analysis, but it was also the first time in over 20 years that I had been absolutely stimulant free. To understand the significance of this, one must first understand the significance of the hormone, aldosterone. Aldosterone, among other functions, is responsible for the conservation of sodium. When sodium intake increases, aldosterone production drops. When sodium intake decreases, aldosterone production rises, thereby balancing one’s serum sodium level. However, aldosterone is produced by the adrenal glands, which, in most people, in our so-called “modern” society, are ravaged by lack of sleep, lack of carbohydrates, dehydration and stimulants. For the past 3 and a half years, I have been entirely stimulant free so my adrenal glands are more than likely doing the job they were intended to do, but that was more than likely not the case 3 years ago.

The point being is that if one is to succeed on any plan, one must have faith in that plan. I think that from the information presented in the post, Man the Frugivore, we may rest assured that man is indeed an herbivore/frugivore. If one, through careful analysis and meticulous study, can arrive at such a conclusion, the next logical step would be then to implement a plan based on that study and conclusion. The more logical one’s conclusion, the more dogged resolution one will have in carrying that plan out especially when one is faced with the consequences of either a body which is developing through the process or because of certain indiscretions which may be committed especially in the beginning of such a bold and rigorous step forward in one’s overall progress.

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Success

Sometimes friends will ask for dietary advice. In general, they become particularly frustrated with a perceived inability to maintain a healthier lifestyle. In the post, Transition, definitive ways of doing this were discussed.

From the psychological aspect, as far as success in a healthier lifestyle or accomplishments in general are concerned, I find that it is not so much about discipline, but more about habit. If one starts to replace old habits with better habits and do that with joy with the thought of what one will gain rather than what one will deprive oneself of, then the journey has begun.

It’s not that discipline plays no role in this, but discipline in itself is a habit. And to rely solely on discipline is going to involve an endless struggle.

It is generally a journey of two steps forward and one step backward, so it is important not to beat oneself up but rather to show a kind and compassionate inward patience. As a person who has struggled with compulsive, emotional eating and behavior for over 25 years, beating oneself up is the last thing that one wants to do. Self derision in this way is a form of suppression rather than control and suppression always yields negative side effects.

The body wants to be healthy. The body rejoices in all things that make it healthy. If there are obstacles, then it is the conscious mind that stands in the way.

To your health and happy 2012 all!

M